Mary Beard Takes On Her Sexist Detractors

iO: A Journal of New American Poetry » A CONVERSATION WITH DANNIEL SCHOONEBEEK

iO: A Journal of New American Poetry » A CONVERSATION WITH DANNIEL SCHOONEBEEK (via instapaper)

"The poem was written in April, and in New York there’s an especially riotous and harrowing two-week period every year in April. You wake up and the sun is not only a fact but a feeling, and it’s a feeling of protest and a taste too, and everyone seems to agree upon this taste and say it with their bodies, which means people are eating outside and loosening their ties and wearing sun dresses, and nothing smells like hot garbage and it still gets cold at night among the flowering trees. It’s a disturbing time to desire. And it’s a disturbing time to file taxes in America, especially if you find yourself reading about suicide rates during this time, as I was in April of that year."

bostonreview:

“This poetics of self-correction is a poetics of attention and imagination in equal measure, a poetics of remembering and recalling and analyzing, doing it over, keeping up a series of approximations, and living in a state of failure that could be, nevertheless, a creative endeavor. When it is not enough, or not possible, simply to correct, it is necessary to go back, rehearse (not a bird, a plane), and figure out what is still possible to say. Along with Bishop, I’m thinking about this way of writing in contexts, personal and political and ecological, of things going wrong, as a way of writing into and before things that are difficult or impossible to think about—complicities, catastrophes—without being silenced by them.” [x]

bostonreview:

This poetics of self-correction is a poetics of attention and imagination in equal measure, a poetics of remembering and recalling and analyzing, doing it over, keeping up a series of approximations, and living in a state of failure that could be, nevertheless, a creative endeavor. When it is not enough, or not possible, simply to correct, it is necessary to go back, rehearse (not a bird, a plane), and figure out what is still possible to say. Along with Bishop, I’m thinking about this way of writing in contexts, personal and political and ecological, of things going wrong, as a way of writing into and before things that are difficult or impossible to think about—complicities, catastrophes—without being silenced by them.” [x]


Beach Houses, from Teenage Stories, 2005

Beach Houses, from Teenage Stories, 2005

(via sesame-oil)

inneroptics:

Rafael Navarro

inneroptics:

Rafael Navarro

(via sesame-oil)

(Source: martinklasch.blogspot.com, via eyes-of-the-fancy)

(Source: sequin-covered-swans, via eyes-of-the-fancy)

hyperallergic:

(via A Chaotic Compendium of the World’s Depravity)
No matter where French photographer Antoine d’Agata travels, he finds the same festering vein of marginalized depravity. Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Damascus, Istanbul, New York, Marseille, San Salvador, Mexico City, Haiti, Hamburg, Havana, Bosnia — he’s visited them all and the anxiety and brief pleasures of the prostitutes, homeless, addicts, and other drifting souls mingles in the same sordid mire.
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hyperallergic:

(via A Chaotic Compendium of the World’s Depravity)

No matter where French photographer Antoine d’Agata travels, he finds the same festering vein of marginalized depravity. Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Damascus, Istanbul, New York, Marseille, San Salvador, Mexico City, Haiti, Hamburg, Havana, Bosnia — he’s visited them all and the anxiety and brief pleasures of the prostitutes, homeless, addicts, and other drifting souls mingles in the same sordid mire.

READ MORE

"In some of the reaches of literary fiction, I feel like there is still a kind of prudishness around female appetite. That it’s somehow a problem, or it’s only interesting if it’s a problem—if it’s the source of suffering, betrayal, someone getting a bottle cracked over her head, someone self-mutilating. It must have harm attached to it to be considered serious. It’s not necessarily true in other media. In television right now, there are some amazing female characters who are very robust. It’s not necessarily true in music, it’s not true in a lot of places. But in literary culture, there’s this idea that female appetite is only the stuff of serious literature if it’s connected to damage. And I object. I object as a writer. I object as a human being. It’s just simply not true. It’s a kind of censorship masquerading as taste."

Lyrical Impulse, Naima Coster interviews Stacey D’Erasmo - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via guernicamag)

artforadults:

mestre fungo

(via imdafterdark)